Tag: technology

  1. Visiting the Computer History Museum.

    13 October 2014

    A couple of months ago, Amberite and I visited the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, California with his father. I'll admit, I wasn't sure what to expect on the way over there. I've been to the Smithsonian quite a few times but the Computer History Museum is just that: Dedicated to the entire history of computing and nothing but. There are exhibits of the history of robotics, video games, military equipment, and of course one of practically every personal computer ever made, from the Amstrad CPC (which never really had a large community in the States, though it was …

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  2. Video from the Global Existential Risks and Radical Futures Conference is up.

    15 September 2014

    UPDATE: 20191230 - Uploaded a copy of the video to my Peertube account.

    In June of 2014 the Global Existential Risks and Radical Futures conference was held in Piedmont, California, which I was invited to present at. After a delay of a couple of months videos of the presentations have been uploaded to YouTube. Among them is the presentation I gave; the audio's a little quiet due to the accoustics of the building and the Q&A has been cut off at the end but it does have the entire talk (local mirror). The presentation's slides aren't in frame but I …

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  3. DefCon 22: The writeup.

    18 August 2014

    The reason I've been quiet so much lately and letting my constructs handle posting things for me is because I was getting ready to attend DefCon 22, one of the largest hacker cons in the world. It's been quite a few years since I last attended DefCon (the last one was DefCon 9, back in 2001.ev) due to the fact that Vegas is, in point of fact, stupidly expensive and when you get right down to it I need to pay bills more than I need to fly to Las Vegas for most of a week. I'm also in …

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  4. Some thoughts on Google Glass.

    07 July 2014

    I feel obligated to make the following disclaimer:

    Yes, I am still a privacy advocate. I still teach crypto and train people in using privacy-preserving technologies. I also still don't trust any service that I can't kick because data I produce through them is the product and not the service. That said, Google and Google Glass don't seem to be going away anytime soon. So, here are some of my thoughts on Glass.

    If you've been bouncing around the consumer electronics set for a while you've undoubtedly heard of Glass, Google's foray into the red-headed stepchild of computer technology for …

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  5. Transhuman visions presentation.

    15 June 2014

    To everyone who attended the Global Existential Risks and Radical Futures Conferences yesterday, thank you. It was an honor and a privilege to meet with and speak to all of you.

    As promised, here are my slides in the form of an HTML5 presentation. They were authored in Markdown and run through Landslide to convert them into HTML5 slides.


    This work by The Doctor [412/724/301/703][ZS] is published under a Creative Commons By Attribution / Noncommercial / Share Alike v4.0 License.

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  6. I'll be presenting at the Global Existential Risks and Radical Futures Conference

    13 March 2014

    I have other stuff to write about that will come in time.

    I'll be presenting at the Global Existential Risks and Radical Futures Conference in San Francisco, CA on 14 June 2014. I'll be giving a talk entitled Echos Into the Past: Outbreaks of Future Technologies in the Present, about technologies that exist right now which the transhumanist community may wish to consider as first steps toward long-term goals.

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  7. New advances in 3D printing.

    07 February 2014

    If you've been following my website for a while you've no doubt read me yammer on again and again about 3D printers that can only use low-melting point plastics as feedstock for manufacture. Usually ABS or PLA plastic, because they're cheap and relatively easy to acquire. Joshua Pearce and his research team at Michigan Tech announced late last year that they've developed an open source metal deposition printer for fabricating tools and components for which plastic isn't appropriate. Their printer lays down thin layers of metal instead of plastic to build up much stronger objects. The total cost to construct …

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  8. Outbreak of the future: 3D printing takes off like a shot.

    09 December 2012

    Last week there was a cluster of outbreaks of the future (thanks, Warren Ellis, for the term) in the field of 3D printing that caught me by surprise, not by their appearance but how they appeared in rapid succession to one another.

    The first is an industrial grade 3D printer called the Objet1000, which is marketed for the production of full-scale prototypes and industrial models. It has a fabrication platform 39 inches by 31 inches in size (a little bigger, actually, but I'm deliberately dropping decimals today), and can print with any of 120 different substances, of which 14 at …

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  9. First workable neuromorphic chip design developed at Intel.

    19 June 2012

    A couple of years back scientists at HP figured out how to make memristors viable. Memristors were first conceived of back in the 1970's and are components that remember (for lack of a better term) how much current passed through them for a particular interval of time. They've been compared to neurons in that the more often they fire, the more likely they are to fire in the future. On the other side of the house, scientists have been trying for decades to figure out the principles (and combination of mechanisms) by which organic brains operate. They're not binary devices …

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  10. Outbreaks of the future: 3d printing.

    15 March 2012

    More and more in the year 2012 of the common era, I find myself noticing what Warren Ellis once called 'outbreaks of the future'. Advances and developments in technology that were once the thoughts of the dreamers of science and are now the fruits of the labor of shapers and makers of novel things. Perhaps it's due to my lack of 3d modeling ability that I tend to focus on the field of 3D printing, which has fascinated me since I helped build a 3d printer several years ago. So it goes.

    The first thing that I noticed was that …

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