Tag: wireless

  1. Spectrum analysis on the cheap.

    01 September 2009

    If you’ve ever hacked around with wireless communications, in particular data networking chances are you’ve come across the oh-so-nifty USB spectrum analyzers that operate in the gigahertz range (which 802.11a, b, and g networks, among other wireless applications, operate within). The idea is simple: you plug the analyzer into a USB port on your laptop, fire up the software, and you can see the whole spectrum broken down into channels with relative signal strengths representing activity on the screen just like in the movies. While granted this can be a useful tool for anyone doing serious RF …

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  2. Replacing teeth and white blood cells, and a wi-fi enabled pacemaker.

    30 August 2009

    I realize that some of these stories are kind of old, but in my defense I work a lot.

    
    

    Scientists at the Tokyo University of Science announced earlier this month that they had grown a replacement tooth for an adult lab mouse. While this doesn’t sound like much given that rodent teeth grow continually through the creature’s life, they accomplished this task by engineering mouse cells to grow teeth and transplanting them into the socket of an extracted tooth. The tooth grown was fully functional, and seemed to have all of the nerve connections, structural integrity, and usability …

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  3. Life and sleep deprivation.

    11 August 2009

    Disclaimer: I got three hours of sleep last night because my sleep schedule is screwed. This post will probably not make a whole lot of sense.

    Lyssa and I organized craft night at our place on Friday evening and put the word out for folks to come over and work on stuff. There isn’t much else that you can say about that, really – I’ve been experimenting with Arch Linux on my netbook to get a sense for whether or not it will work for my purposes. I would eventually like to use my EeePC as a wearable computer …

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  4. Wardriving new parts of NOVA.

    18 July 2009

    When I first started driving I taught myself how to navigate Pittsburgh by filling up my car with gas, picking a direction to drive in for fifteen or twenty miles, and getting thoroughly lost. I’d then spend the evening trying to get back home, or failing that, someplace that I recognized and could navigate from. I was thinking about that this morning as I attached a GPS puck to the roof of my car and ran the interface cable through the window. It’s been a long and busy couple of weeks, so while Lyssa was out and about …

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  5. I'm here today with absolutely nothing to talk about.. and that's what I want to talk to you about.

    05 April 2009

    Still not dead. Still not sleeping, either.

    Work has been keeping me busy lately, but thankfully not due to a certain beastie that was supposed to go off last week. Conflicker.C appears to have been something of a damp squib, and I for one am grateful. I'm not terribly surprised that it didn't bring about The End of the Net as we Know It. Hyperbole and RPG references aside, packing an out-of-date exploit as a primary vector of infection coupled with samples of the Conflicker.C binary itself winding up in the hands of practically every antivirus researcher on …

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  6. Shmoocon 2009: ...duck!!

    08 February 2009

    It's been six hours since I got back from Shmoocon, and I'm still readjusting to a low information density environment. Shmoocon is DC's premiere hacker con, held early every February by a security research outfit called the Shmoo Group, which seems to have an odd interest in moose (judging by the repeating moose motif all over the place, from the free stickers to the laser cut acrylic convention badges). I've wanted to go for a couple of years but various and sundry things kept me from attending, so when I finally was able to score a ticket I jumped at …

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  7. The RepRap build-a-thon in review.

    28 January 2009

    The weekend of the RepRap build-a-thon at HacDC started off simply: Lyssa and I went to dinner at Konami. We haven't been out for sushi for a number of months, due to my getting sick there in 2007. However, the food is still good and we enjoyed ourselves. I was unusually popular that night; my cellphone kept ringing every few minutes for various and sundry reasons. After dinner I dropped Lyssa off at home, loaded my gear into the trunk of my car, and headed to Hasufin's to pick him up because we were off to HacDC to help set …

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  8. WPA/TKIP partially broken?

    06 November 2008

    Just when you thought it was safe to raise an antenna and go wireless again, along comes another attack to make you think twice. A pair of security researchers, Erik Tews and Martin Beck, will present a new attack against WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access) at the PacSec conference next week. If you're not up on wireless network technologies, WPA is the system developed to secure wireless network traffic after WEP was found to be too insecure. The basic purpose of WPA is to encrypt all data traffic between a wireless client and an access point (modulo the control packets, of …

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  9. Title restored - so how did I spend my weekend, anyway?

    05 May 2008

    Unfortunately, I spent much of last Friday asleep, recovering after a routine filling went south and turned into an emergency root canal. I don't know what does it about the procedure, but it wipes me out completely - it might be the body reacting to having a part of it removed with what amounts to tiny drill bits, or it might be the knowledge of it. For all I know, it could be the aftereffects of multiple injections of local anesthetic that happens to contain epinephrine, which would logically bring about a fight-or-flight reaction as the syringe-loads naturally leaked into the …

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  10. In the future, someone else might own your prosthetics.

    19 March 2008

    ..and I don't mean the finance company.

    I know this is late in coming, but real life has a better framerate sometimes. Anyway, a security research outfit called Secure Medicine, following in the footsteps of security researcher Gadi Evron raised some interesting questions about the current generation of biomedical cardiac implants in use these days, such as pacemakers and LVADs (left ventricular assist devices). Due to the fact that these devices are remotely controllable to a certain extent via wireless data link they are vulnerable to compromise by attackers and may be manipulated. This sounds asanine, but LVADs are implanted …

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