Keybase and Git.

Nov 27 2017

A couple of weeks ago a new release of the Keybase software package came out, and this one included as one of its new features support for natively hosting Git repositories.  This doesn't seem like it's very useful for most people, and it might really only be useful to coders, but it's a handy enough service that I think it's worth a quick tutorial.  Prior to that feature release something in the structure of the Keybase filesystem made it unsuitable for storing anything but static copies of Git repositories (I don't know exactly waht), but they've now made Git a first class citizen.

I'm going to assume that you use the Git distributed version control system already, and you have at least one Git repository that you want to host on Keybase; for the purposes of this example I'm going to use my personal copy of the Exocortex Halo code repository on Github.  I'm further going to assume that you know the basics of using Git (cloning repositories, committing changes, pulling and pushing changes).  I'm also going to assume that you already have a Keybase account and a fairly up-to-date copy of the software installed.  I am, however, going to talk a little bit about the idea of remotes in Git.  My discussion will necessarily have some technical inaccuracies for the sake of usability if you're not an expert on the internals of Git.

Neologism: Jenkins Driven Development

Mar 18 2017

JDD (Jenkins driven development) - noun - A development process in which the coder in question has one or two commits to the source code repository adding a feature or fixing a bug, followed by two or three dozen commits to fix things in the comments, unit tests, variable names, or some other such fiddly thing to coax the Jenkins server into actually running the unit tests to exercise the new code and hopefully integrate the new feature.  The primary usage of time by developers in DevOps environments.  The later commit messages usually consist of variations of "Does it work yet?", "WTF", "Dammit Jenkins", "Editing comments because Jenkins won't test the code", or other combinations of profanity and the equivalent of mumbling to oneself in frustration.

Special thanks to the anonymous cow-orker who came up with the term.