Arch Linux, systemd, and RAID.

May 13 2016

Long, long time readers of my blog might remember Leandra, the server that I've had running in my lab in one configuration or another since high school (10th grade, in point of fact). She's been through many different incarnations and has run pretty much every x86 CPU ever made since the 80386. She's also run most of the major distributions of Linux out there, starting with Slackware and most recently running Arch Linux (all of the packages of Gentoo with none of the spending hours compiling everything under the sun or fighting with USE flags). It's also possible to get a full Linux install going with only the packages you need in a relatively small amount of disk space; my multimedia machine, for example, is only 2.7 gigabytes in size and Leandra as she stands right now has a relatively svelte 1.1 gigabytes of systemware. However, Arch Linux was an early adopter of something called systemd, which aims to be a complete replacement of the traditional UNIX-like init system that tries to manage dependencies of services, parallelize startup and shutdown of system features, automatically start and stop stuff, replace text-based system logs with a binary database, and all sorts of bleeding edge stuff like that.

Some people love systemd. Some people hate systemd. Personally, I think it is what my besainted grandmother would say, enough to piss off the Pope. That's not really what I'm writing about, though. What I'm writing about is a problem I ran into getting Leandra back up and running after building a fairly sizeable RAID array with logical volumes built on top of it.