Changing the IP address of a Solaris 10 machine.


  1. Edit /etc/hosts, change the IP address corresponding to the system's hostname.

  2. Edit /etc/netmasks, change the network and subnet mask.

  3. If required, edit /etc/defaultrouter and set the new default gateway of the system.

  4. Edit /etc/inet/ipnodes, change the IP address of the system's hostname. This file trumps all of the other TCP/IP config files, so if you miss this file everything else is pointless. Alternatively, you can delete or rename this file, and this will trick the Solaris 10 SMF subsystem into thinking it's an IPv4-only system.

  5. shutdown -i 6 -y -g 5 to reboot the …
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Solaris 10 can bite me.

Thank you, thank you, and fuck you, Sun Microsystems for having Solaris 10 print "Do you wish to automatically update boot archives?" when you really mean "Your root filesystem is fucked - attempt a fsck(1M)?"

Random knowledge II.

If you turn on the Xscreensaver module called Sonar while you're running a packet monitoring application (such as TCPdump), people are less likely to think you're doing anything shady, because "Only hacker tools don't have GUIs." Always hack your shell's personal configuration file (~/.bash_profile, for example) to change your shellprompt if you use GNU screen. That way you can tell what shells you've left open are single-access shells and which shells are multiplexed through a single connection with screen. It can get confusing sometimes. Because a shell run inside a GNU screen metaterminal sets an environment variable called $WINDOW, you …

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