"We'll make sure they get paid, even though they don't work for us..."

A couple of weeks ago, the RIAA managed to get a law passed that requires royalties to be paid to them for all music streamed across the Net, regardless of the reason or origin of the music. If you listen to the audio stream coming from a local commercial radio station's website, they're paying the RIAA royalties for the privilege (then again, chances are they're getting paid by the RIAA to only play certain songs - this has been known for years but no one's been in a position to do anything about it). If you read the fine print, though …

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The RIAA sues people about as accurately as Stormtroopers can shoot.

The RIAA, in its effort to sue everyone and everything it can on the face of the planet because it thinks they've been pirating music has filed suit against a retiree who is paralysed on the left side of his body, nevermind the fact that he is probably unable to use a computer because he is medically disabled. John Paladuk is also largely unable to speak due to the stroke which paralysed him.

On top of that, his sole means of income is his disability check.

The RIAA is at it again - they want you responsible for your network link, regardless of who uses it.

Not too long ago, a woman named Debbie Foster was sued by Capitol Records (RIAA) for copyright infringement because someone was using her network access account to exchange music on $peer_to_peer_network. As it turned out during the investigation phase, someone had cracked the passphrase on her account and was using it without her knowledge. Thus, the lawsuit had to be dropped because the RIAA was suing the wrong person (which has never stopped them in the past). The RIAA was commanded by the court to pay her legal fees, which topped $50kus in total. The RIAA in turn filed a …

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