Keybase, font sizes, and screen resolution.

Aug 12, 2017

Some time ago I wrote an article about what Keybase is and what it's good for.  I also mentioned one of my pet peeves, which is that, by default the fonts used by the Keybase desktop client are way, way too small to see easily on Windbringer.  A couple of days ago somebody finally figured out how to blow up the fonts on the desktop, so I can finally see what's going on without putting my nose on the display (and making the mouse cursor jump around because Windbringer has a touchscreen).  While I wish that this would be a configuration option in the GUI (or, hell, even a config file) I'll take what I can get.  First, some background so everything makes sense...

Point in time documentation of the Keybase Chat API

Jun 19, 2017

A couple of months back I did a brief writeup of Keybase and what it's good for.  I mentioned briefly that it implements a 1-to-n text chat feature, where n>=1.  Yes, this means that you can use Keybase Chat to talk to yourself, which is handy for prototyping and debugging code.  What does not seem to be very well known is that the Keybase command line utility has a JSON API, the documentation of which you can scan through by issuing the command `keybase chat help api` from a command window.  I'm considering incorporating Keybase into my exocortex so I spent some time one afternoon playing around with the API, seeing what I could make it do, and writing up what I had to do to make it work.  As far as I know there is no official API documentation anywhere; at least, Argus and I didn't find any.  So, under the cut are my notes in the hope that it helps other people work with the Keybase API.

The API may drift a bit, so here are the software versions I used during testing:

Client:  1.0.22-20170512224715+f5fba02ec
Service: 1.0.22-20170512224715+f5fba02ec

What is Keybase good for, anyway?

Feb 23, 2017

UPDATE - 20170228 - Added more stuff I've discovered about KBFS.

A couple of years ago you probably heard about this thing called Keybase launching with a private beta, and it purported itself to be a new form of public key encryption for the masses, blah blah blah, whatever.. but what's this thing good for, exactly?  I mean, it was pretty easy to request an invite from the service and either never get one, or eventually receive an e-mail and promptly forget about it.  I've been using it off and on for a while, and I recently sat down to really mess around with it and get a sense for how it's changed and what it can do.  Plus, there's a fair amount of outdated or bad information floating around out there, and I wanted to do my part to set the record straight.

I'm not going to spend time explaining public key crypto because I wrote a pretty decent introduction to it that I give at cryptoparties.  Take a look at the PDF of the presentation; I tried to make it as painless as I could.  I want to keep this post focused on Keybase.