MIT
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Pouring down rain in Cambridge.

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Taken from a conference room at the Media Lab.

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A flatscreen television describing a project called Lifelong Kindergarten.

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The Kinect on top of the display was used to turn it into a touchscreen.

 
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White LEDs in a paisley pattern.

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Poster describing an interactive called 640x480.

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The lit pixels can be picked up, moved around, and caused to change color.

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Fingerpainting with sound.

 
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A simple circuit that lets the user turn anything that's weakly conductive into a game controller.

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Photographs taken from the balcony of experimental modes of transportation.

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Every component of this mechanical clock was fabricated on a laser cutter.

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This clockwork mechanism was fabbed on a next-generation 3d printer out of plastic.

 
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The clock wasn't assembled. It was printed already assembled. It's fully operational, too.

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Closeup of the timekeeping mechanism of the clock.

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The mechanism, escapement, and chain of the clock, outside of the casing.

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A ring which turns any flat surface into a gesture recognition system.

 
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