1. At last: The anti-EULA.

    26 January 2007

    Have you ever read an end-user license agreement before? I mean really sat down and read one, and not just scrolled through it just to unlock the little 'I agree' button at the bottom of the window so that you could install software that, legally you didn't really buy but actually bought permission to use for a while on your computer. There's some pretty scary stuff in EULAs these days, such as consent to have spyware installed on said box and dropping certain customer protection rights written into law, on the off chance that the software goes haywire and wrecks …

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  2. Diebold's had more than three strikes against it by now...

    26 January 2007

    Why don't they just give up on Dibold's e-voting machines? They're already been proven insecure and unauditable beyond the shadow of a doubt. They've already compromised the hardware and software in an undetectible manner. The keys to the locks can be freely purchased online... or fabricated by hand because Diebold put an image of the master key on their website. Because the locks used on the Diebold electronic voting machines are the same ones used on many filing cabinets (the locks of which can be purchased in many hardware and office supply stores), it wasn't hard for Kinard of the …

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  3. Maine tells the REAL ID Act to go take a hike.

    26 January 2007

    Remember the REAL ID Act of 2005, which mandates that every US citizen must be issued a national ID card that fits certain federal standards, is electronically readable, and most importantly will be necessary if you ever want to get a job, open a bank account, or fly. They are also supposed to be damn near impossible to copy or counterfit, though the usual rules of sitting at the console when attacking apply. Well, the state of Maine flat out rejected it and asked Congress to repeal the REAL ID Act, and Georgia, Massachusetts, Montana, and Washington state are also …

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  4. You have to hand it to him, he's fighting tooth and claw..

    26 January 2007

    He might be the fall guy, but Scooter Libby's not going down without a fight as testimony on the stand from witnesses lays out the damage and spin control operations the White House activated when allegations of WMDs in Iraq were proven false. Catherine Martin took the stand yesterday, and started laying out who was holding which puppet strings and who tugged on them when. It's amazing what one can do to make everone forget about being made to look like fools on national television..

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  5. A new world record!

    25 January 2007

    The hacker spirit perseveres in all things, especially when it comes to squeezing every last compute cycle out of one's hardware. OC Team Italy set a new world record recently by overclocking a Pentium-4 processor core to 8.0GHz. The CPU they used in their grand experiment is a model 631, and runs natively at 3.0GHz. Their secret sauce to keep the unit from going Chernobyl? Liquid nitrogen.

    On one hand, this horrifies the sysadmin in me. On the other.. rock the hell on. A round of beer's on me if I ever meet you guys face to face …

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  6. DNS greylisting to lessen the amount of incoming spam.

    25 January 2007

    Greylisting is a technique for slowing down the oncoming torrent of spam on the Net today by breaking spamware that isn't compliant with the SMTP RFCs. It consists of a simple alteration to your DNS zonefiles that places an IP address that doesn't have anything listening on port 25/TCP in the position of your primary MX, and the addresses of your real MX's in positions of lower priority in you DNS zone. Spamware that isn't compliant looks at your DNS records for the IP address of the primary MX, tries to contact it, fails, and gives up, or at …

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  7. Interview with Muslix64.

    25 January 2007

    More from the front lines of the DVD content protection war - slyck.com has posted an interview with Muslix64, who cracked the copy protection of both HD DVD and Blu-Ray within a couple of weeks of work as an act of 'fair use enforcement'. When you consider the fact that you can't watch either of these kinds of DVD on anything but an HDCP High-Definition monitor (which very few people have), you have to wonder if you really have fair use of the DVDs you purchase anyway... the interview also goes on to explain how AACS works, and that by …

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  8. A relaxing Wednesday night hanging around the apartment.

    25 January 2007

    Last night was one of the more fun and interesting nights I've had in a while. After Lyssa and I got home last night we took turns playing Dance Dance Revolution Supernova, which I'd gotten for her for Yule last year (she played first while I ate dinner and got some lifestyle maintenance done, then she took a shower while I played a few rounds), and then we picked up and got into the TARDIS to pick up Orthaevelve, who was celebrating signing her first publishing contract with Immanion Press. We first hit the local library to return Lyssa's library …

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  9. New superdense memory cells at UCLA.

    25 January 2007

    And the hits just keep on coming.. researchers at UCLA have developed a memory circuit that can store 20KB of data in a physical space the size of a white blood cell. Compared to current random-access memory circuits of 2007, this new circuit has a data density of 100 gigabits per square centimeter, which is a new world record, if nothing else. That single memory cell can store the complete text of the Declaration of Independence of the United States of America and still have some room left over. Unfortunately, this is just a lab toy, and isn't anywhere near …

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