1. Snow for sale and more.

    31 January 2007

    For those of you wondering if winter's ever going to arrive, wonder no more! Someone in Fort Collins, Colorado is selling samples of snow from the blizzards they've been having all season. He's selling ten (10) samples at $0.99us each, shipped in sealed one gallon baggies. So far, he hasn't decided if he's going to pack the in dry ice for preservation.

    Just when you thought home aquaria had reached its pinnacle, someone comes along and builds a habitrail for his fish that goes all through his apartment. Hacking home fabrication systems.

    Here's an unclassified memo written by the …

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  2. Archive: 20070112

    31 January 2007

    It's just about the middle of January, and just now has winter come to DC. I don't want to say that it's cold or anything but we've gone from wearing t-shirts and shorts outside to frost on the windows and multiple layers of clothing because the temperature has been below freezing for much of the day. As if that weren't enough, the wind's been cold enough to feel like it's cutting right through you, and the pressure waves of cold air coming off of the Metro trains when they arrive at the station are enough to deaden one's sense of …

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  3. Network monitoring en masse.

    31 January 2007

    Well, it seems that Carnivore DCS-1000 isn't enough to feed the gaping information maw of the FBI. Rather than sniff the traffic associated only with a single IP address they've decided to record ALL of the traffic for a given netblock and analyze it offline. For my readers who don't understand how this might apply to them (you know that I'm headed for the Fourth Amendment already), here's a quick rundown of the principle. IP addresses are organised into contiguous blocks that make them easy to manage. If your DSL provider assigns you the IP address 192.16.10.42 …

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  4. Network neutrality back before Congress.

    31 January 2007

    Network neutrality is back on the docket, in the form of the Internet Freedom Preservation Act, introduced to the Senate on 9 January 2007. The last time a bill like this was introduced it was shot down with a vote along partisan lines but thankfully grassroots efforts kept anything bad from happening to the Net as a result. It's time to write your representatives and ask them to vote in favour of this bill, everyone. Get to it.

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  5. Apple sets a major legal precedent for amateur journalism.

    31 January 2007

    A major precedent has been set in net.law following Apple losing its lawsuit against Apple Insider and O'grady's Power Page. In those lawsuits, Apple sued to uncover the identities of the people who leaked information about an audio playback device that Apple was going to release at some point (I think it was supposed to be the iPod Nano - I don't follow Apple news), and stated that amateur news sites and writers are not covered by the laws that protect professional journalists. The court, however, decided that there is no reliable test that can be used to distinguish legitimate …

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