1. Not dead, only sleeping.

    17 October 2009

    I'm still alive, but with everything going on at work and at home I'm pretty ragged right now. I've been working on an essay or two that I wanted to post but it takes an act of will right now to string together a single paragraph. I'm also hoping to track down some unusual glitches on the back end of my website with the help of PivotX's lead developer, but that'll have to happen after I get a good night's sleep.

    Frankly, I don't trust myself to not write something impressively stupid while feeling like my head is stuffed …

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  2. Lyssa's home from the hospital.

    09 October 2009

    Lyssa's home from the hospital and recovering in the next room.

    Her surgery was scheduled for 1400 EST5EDT today at a surgicenter just down the street from the specialist she went to yesterday. There was a bit of a mishap on the way to the car this afternoon because our apartment complex is berift of accessibility features for the handicapped. Lyssa fell again on the sidewalk, though it seemed that the thermoplastic fitted splint took the brunt of the shock. All things considered, however, the surgery itself took a little over two hours. Grant and I spent some time with …

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  3. Enough fighting with mod_rewrite.

    08 October 2009

    One of the quirks of the old version of Pivot I used to run was that it generated its RSS and ATOM feeds as static XML files with the names /rss.xml and /atom.xml, respectively. Since upgrading to PivotX, which implements these news feeds in a standard fashion (i.e., with the URLs /rss and /atom) with some URL rewrites, everyone who was using the URLs generated by the old release was left out in the cold. I've been trying to set up mod_rewrite to transparently redirect requests for the old feeds to the new ones with an HTTP …

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  4. Update on Lyssa.

    08 October 2009

    In a nutshell: Lyssa's achilles tendon is indeed compromised.

    She woke me up around 0600 EST5EDT this morning complaining about the pain in her ankle. After we took our turns in the shower (and let me tell you, trying to maneuver in an apartment-sized bathroom on crutches is no walk in the park) I re-did the splint on her leg and helped her get dressed. Somehow she managed to get an appointment with an orthopedic surgeon shortly after 0900 EST5EDT today (she always was the social engineer of the family), and a consultation confirmed our fears: her achilles tendon is …

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  5. So much for a night on the town...

    08 October 2009

    A couple of weeks ago, Lyssa and I bought a couple of tickets to see the Australian Pink Floyd Show, a world-renowned Pink Floyd cover band that is widely considered to be the closest you can come without actually seeing PF live. Unfortunately, Laurelinde had to back out at the last minute due to a scheduling conflict, so Kash drove down from the vicinity of Baltimore to join us tonight. I got home from work a little later than usual so after changing clothes and filling out my daily timesheet the three of us hit the local deli for a …

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  6. Congratulations, Seele and Justin!

    01 October 2009

    I realize this is a bit late but between the wedding and guests staying for a couple of days last week, work has piled up such that I haven’t been able to write for a couple of days now.

    Two Fridays ago Lyssa and I traveled back to Pennsylvania at separate times to attend the wedding of Seele and Justin at the Stone Villa Winery (1085 Clay Pike Road; Acme, PA; 15610). Like most weddings, the setup was a multi-month affair and took not a bit of planning on the back end to make everything go off smoothly as …

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  7. AR contact lenses and 3D printed handcuff keys.

    18 September 2009

    It’s long been a trope of science fiction where one of the characters has the capacity for superhuman access to data in realtime, usually through prosthetic eyes that incorporate heads-up displays that make geospatial coordinates and targeting information available without the distraction of having to look down at a monitor of some kind. In point of fact, this isn’t anything particularly new. Fighter jets like the FA-18 have long had transparent monitors positioned directly in the pilot’s field of vision that incorporate much of the information of the instruments on the panel. Players of first-person shooters like …

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