Just when you thought you were hardcore...

Mar 17, 2016

The more densely packed computing circuitry becomes, the fast it can run, in part because the connection paths are so short. Until room-temperature superconductors are invented, passing an electrical current through a physical connection, no matter how short, will prevent the current from running at the speed of light due to the phenomenon of electrical resistence. Another problem arises as a result of densely packing circuitry: Heat. Lots of heat.

This is a problem that can't really be eliminated, because heat is a natural manifestation of entropy. When you lose decoherence in anything for any reason waste heat is generated. Generate too much waste heat, and whatever is doing the generating will start to melt or catch on fire. This is why processor cores have heat sinks on them - to channel the waste heat away from the module so that they don't malfunction or burn out. Presenting the Coolermaster Geminii, the Tim Taylor of PC heatsinks. This particular heatsink can be used with AMD X2 dual core CPUs, Intel Core 2 Duo CPUs, and Intel Core 2 Extreme CPUs; as a bonus, it can also keep your motherboard chipset and video card GPUs cool, which is always a bonus for overclockers. On top of that, the top of the Geminii can be used to mount a pair of 120mm exhaust fans to keep pulling hot air off of the aluminum fins. Because it's so large, the copper heat pipes are semiflexible, which allows the cooling surface to be repositioned within reason inside the case. Just in case you can't close your case properly after installing it.

I wonder if they have an 'Iwakura, Lain' on their design team...