Vagaries of bone conduction.

Sep 24, 2010

While sitting in the dentist's chair this morning I discovered something very interesting.

Granted, I only went in for a checkup and cleaning so it wasn't as bad as it usually is. Given that about a third of my teeth are artificial in some way - usually cored, packed with plastic and capped with surgical steel and porcelain - it should have been obvious in hindsight. It appears that the physics of sound propagation through modified teeth are markedly different than those customary to un-altered dentition. To put it simply, I've never felt the cavitron hurt quite so much because the sound went straight to my inner ears and made an ordinarily annoying procedure much less pleasant. It's also possible (in fact, downright likely) that the new cavities had something to do with this.

It's never good when you dentist has both kinds of news because the bad news tends to be expensive.

The latest x-rays show that I have multiple (a shade less than a dozen) very small cavities in between all of my front teeth on the top. They're not egregiously large, the dentin isn't yet involved so they're not quite visible but they're definitely present and breeding like unpatched Windows machines. They would also explain the odd bouts of sensitivity that I've been getting once in a while, sensory nerve self-tests I'd thought. I'm told that it'll be fairly easy to clean them out and fill them so I'm not that concerned, but it is going to cost me something like $700us if it's done before my dental insurance refereshes in January.

Oh, well. At least I had three months and change of no dental worries. That's actually a personal best.