Setting up converse.js as a web-based chat client.

Apr 09 2017

As not bleeding edge, nifty-keen-like-wow the XMPP protocol is, Jabber (the colloquial name for XMPP I'll be using them interchangably in this article) has been my go-to means of person-to-person chat (as well as communication protocol with other parts of me) for a couple of years now.  There are a bunch of different servers out there on multiple platforms, they all support pretty much the same set of features (some have the experimental features, some don't), and the protocol is federated, which is to say that every server can talk to every other server out there (unless you turn that function off), kind of like e-mail.  You can also build some pretty crazy stuff on top of it and not have to worry about the low-level stuff, which isn't necessarily the case with newer protocols like Matrix.  There are also interface libraries for just about every programming language out there.  For example, in my Halo project I use SleekXMPP because it lets me configure only what I want to out of the box and handles all of the fiddly stuff for me (like responding to the different kinds of keepalive pings that Jabber clients send).  Hack to live, not live to hack, right?  There are also XMPP clients for just about every platform out there, from humble Android devices to Windows 10 monstrosities.  However, sometimes you find yourself in a situation in which your XMPP client can't reach the server for whatever reason (and there are some good reasons, let's be fair).

Exocortex: Halo

Mar 26 2016

In my last post on the topic of exocortices I discussed the Huginn project, how it works, what the code for the agents actually look like, and some of the stuff I use Huginn's agent networks for for in my everyday life. In short, I call it my exocortex - an extension of the information processing capabilities of my brain running in silico instead of in vivo. Now I'm going to talk about Exocortex Halo, a separate suite of bots which augment Huginn to carry out tasks that Huginn by itself isn't designed to carry out very easily, and thus extend my personal capabilities significantly.

Now, don't get me wrong, Huginn has a fantastic suite of agents built into it already and more are being added every day. However, good design techniques require one to realize when an existing software architecture is suited for some things and not others, and allowances should be made for that. To put it another way, it was highly unlikely that I would be able to shoehorn the additional functionality I wanted into Huginn and have a hope in hell of it working. However, what Huginn has a multitude of are interfaces for getting events into and out of itself, and I could make use of those interfaces for plugging my own bots into it. The Website Agent is ideal for pinging REST API interfaces of my own design; Jabber Agent implements a simple XMPP client which can send events to an address on an XMPP server (assuming that it has its own login credentials); oversimplifying a bit, Webhook Agent basically sets up a custom REST API rail that external software can use to send events into Huginn for processing; Data Output Agent is used for sending events out of Huginn in the form of an RSS feed or a JSON document that can be consumed and parsed by other software.