Using Nginx to spoof HTTP Host headers.

Feb 02 2020

EDIT: s/alice.bob.com/alice.example.com/ to fix part of the backstory.

Let's say that you have a server (like Prosody) that has one or more subsystems (like BOSH and Websockets).  You want to stick them behind a web server like Nginx so that they can be accessed via HTTP - let's say that you want a browser to be able to communicate with those subsystems for some reason.  Or more likely you have a web application that needs to communicate with them in the same way (because Javascript).  Assuming that the above features are already enabled in Prosody, you would put something like this in one of your Nginx config files for, let's say for the sake of argument alice.example.com:

...
    location /http-bind {
        proxy_pass http://localhost:5280/http-bind;
        proxy_set_header Host $host;
        proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $remote_addr;
        proxy_buffering off;
        tcp_nodelay on;
    }
    location /xmpp-websocket {
        proxy_pass http://localhost:5280/xmpp-websocket;
        proxy_http_version 1.1;
        proxy_set_header Connection "Upgrade";
        proxy_set_header Upgrade $http_upgrade;
        proxy_set_header Host $host;
        proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-For $remote_addr;
        proxy_read_timeout 900s;
    }
...

location is the part of the URL Nginx knows it has resources for.  proxy_pass tells Nginx that, whenever something tries to access that part of the URL (https://alice.example.com/http-bind or https://alice.example.com/xmpp-websocket) it should transparently proxy the connection to the given URL (http://localhost:5280/http-bind or /xmpp-websocket, depending) and forward responses back to the client).

But what if you did something a bit less sensible, like put the client on a different host?

Setting up converse.js as a web-based chat client.

Apr 09 2017

As not bleeding edge, nifty-keen-like-wow the XMPP protocol is, Jabber (the colloquial name for XMPP I'll be using them interchangably in this article) has been my go-to means of person-to-person chat (as well as communication protocol with other parts of me) for a couple of years now.  There are a bunch of different servers out there on multiple platforms, they all support pretty much the same set of features (some have the experimental features, some don't), and the protocol is federated, which is to say that every server can talk to every other server out there (unless you turn that function off), kind of like e-mail.  You can also build some pretty crazy stuff on top of it and not have to worry about the low-level stuff, which isn't necessarily the case with newer protocols like Matrix.  There are also interface libraries for just about every programming language out there.  For example, in my Halo project I use SleekXMPP because it lets me configure only what I want to out of the box and handles all of the fiddly stuff for me (like responding to the different kinds of keepalive pings that Jabber clients send).  Hack to live, not live to hack, right?  There are also XMPP clients for just about every platform out there, from humble Android devices to Windows 10 monstrosities.  However, sometimes you find yourself in a situation in which your XMPP client can't reach the server for whatever reason (and there are some good reasons, let's be fair).