Montage: Restoring a C64 and 1541 drive.

May 20 2020

A couple of days back I posted a writeup of how I restored my old Commodore 64, from taking it apart to putting it back together and firing it up for the first time in over 30 years.  As I am wont to do, I periodically took photographs of my progress.  Well, here they are.  I didn't do a full how-to because folks more experienced than I have already done so (that's how I learned how to do this in the first place).  I'll put more stuff online as I make more progress.  Enjoy.

Adventures in retrocomputing: Restoring a vintage Commodore 64.

May 18 2020

You've probably been wondering where I've been since my last update in the latter half of April.  I mean, where would I reasonably go right now when most of the country is locked down and only a relatively small number of people with more memes running inside their heads than conscious processes are running around with mall ninja gear and weapons (some props, most unfortunately not) doing their damndest to cut the population by infecting everyone around them with covid-19?  Well.. when I haven't been working (as one does) I've been reconditioning my old Commodore-64 computer, the first computer I ever used as a kid.  I've been carrying it around with me just about everywhere I've moved but it's only recently that I've had the time to really do any messing around with it (for obvious reasons).  It has been a learning experience if nothing else, because much of my knowledge of how to do stuff on a 40 year old computer has faded and been overwritten as technology has progressed.  It's also given me a lot of appreciation for how much things have changed for the better since the days of LOAD "$",8 and LIST.  Computers may not come with their own programming languages anymore, but the ones we have are significantly more featureful, significantly cheaper (I vaguely recall seeing an advertisement for a C compiler in 1986 for the Commodore 64 for the low, low price of $275us or therabouts), and way more accessible thanks to the Web and open source software.

This was not a quick process. I worked on this project in my spare time, in between working from home, going on supply runs for my family (and decontaminating afterward), taking care of stuff around the house, and waiting for orders of components, cleaning materials, and sundry things to arrive so I could proceed.  What with supply lines being all screwed up by the coronavirus quarantine, sometimes an order from Los Angeles would take two weeks to get to northern California but an order from Massachusetts would show up two days later due to unexpected overnight shipping.  It was also a labor of considerable monetary investment; I think my parents bought my C64 for something like $500us back in 1984.ev, and I easily sank that much money over the course of a couple of weeks into this effort.  Not that it's been in vain.

The first thing I had to do was clean everything up.  40 years of use, dust, and gunk can wreak havoc on any kind of electronics and I figured that I'd have my work cut out for me.  The first step, and arguably the most fun was taking the whole thing apart layer by layer.  I used old pill bottles and some tiny test tubes to sort all of the screws by purpose (hold the case together, hold the keyboard on, hold the keyboard together, and so forth) to make it easier to put everything back together later.  I also took copious photographs every step of the way, of which I will put up a gallery a little bit later.  It never hurts to know how things were put together before you started messing with them, right?  Working on the keyboard involved dismantling it into its constituent layers.  Popping all of the keys off required just a flathead screwdriver inserted under the key and using the shaft of same to pop them loose like a lever.  The springs and screws I soaked in vinegar for 24 hours to dissolve the rust; only one spring was rusted enough to break but that was near one of the ends, so it wasn't as bad as it could have been.  The sheer amount of crap under the keys, however, was nothing short of hair raising.  A can of compressed air didn't really accomplish much.  I wound up putting the plastic body of the keyboard into the kitchen sink and working it over with dishwashing detergent and a pot scrubber to remove decades of cat hair, dust, dry skin, and crumbs.  The keys went into baggies full of warm water and hand soap overnight, agitated every two or three hours to get most of the gunk loose.  Afterward I scrubbed them in the sink with an old toothbrush to get them looking nice again.

Still on lockdown.

Apr 05 2020

All of March and most of February were spent in lockdown in the Bay Area.  I've no idea what's still open or not because the last time I was able to go anywhere outside of the house was two weeks ago.  The walk I'd planned for last weekend was cancelled on account of rain, and all things considered I'd rather not risk lowering my immune system a couple of points with cold and damp if I can help it.  Plans for the next 12 to 18 months have been unilaterally cancelled.  I've already sold my Thotcon 0x0b badge even though the conference has been rescheduled, and I've unfortunately had to cancel on HOPE as well.  The reason is this: Even though both conferences are supposed to happen after the covid-19 lockdown is (theoretically) over, there probably won't be a usable vaccine inside of 12 to 18 months. (one) (two) (three)  As the being in the house in the fewest risk categories this means that there is a good chance that I might contract asymptomatic covid-19, bring it home and give it to everybody else.  That's no good (as if that need be said).

There's really no point in watching the news for additional coronavirus news.  The pandemic is here and finding out the latest bad thing isn't going to do anybody any good.  Additionally, there's enough bad information being deliberately spread (one) (two) (three) (four) (oh, fuck it) that it takes way more processing power than a lot of us have to sort it out.  Just knowing that misinformation is being deliberately spread is disheartening.  I strongly advise that everybody take Samuel L. Jackson's advice.

Retro-futurist museum exhibit, SFO, 2019

Nov 29 2019

A common feature at the main terminal of SFO is a museum exhibit of some kind.  My last time through that particular airport they had a retro-futurist display of artifacts that dated back to the Space Age, all rounded corners and brass fittings and suchlike.  Definitely an aesthetic, if that's your sort of thing.

Anyway, pictures.

Pictures from my trip to San Diego, summer 2019.ev

Nov 29 2019

Last summer my day job sent me down to San Diego, CA to attend the Linux Security Summit and report back.  Unfortunately just about all of the content there intersected in no way, shape, or form with anything we're working on so it was largely a dog wash.  I probably won't attend again because, balancing the cost against the information gotten it just wasn't worth it.  I did, however, take a couple of engineers from Oracle for their first good sushi dinner ever, took an amphibious boat tour of San Diego Bay, and hiked along the waterfront for a couple of hours.

Pictures.

Cult of the Dead Cow book signing, 22 June 2019.

Nov 29 2019

If you were part of the hacker scene in the 1980's or 90's (or you played a certain tradition in Mage: The Ascension around that time) you undoubtedly have come across the weird, wonderful, bewildering, and occasionally insightful antics of The Cult of the Dead Cow, a crew of hackers originally based out of Texas who were well known for their periodic text file releases.  What isn't well known until very recently is that many cDc alumni have gone on to do great things, from starting one of the first security companies to ascending to C-level status at some well known megacorps to overseeing government security initiatives.  Earlier this year one Joseph Menn (nice guy, by the bye) wrote a book about them which is extensively researched and fun to read in general.  Menn's book tour happened to bring him to the Internet Archive along with some cDc alumni.

Bask in the presence of the C0w.

Concert photos: Curse Mackey, the Bellwether Syndicate, and Clan of Xymox

Feb 10 2019

There are few better ways to kick off the holiday season than with a good concert.  2018 was no exception in this regard - the DNA Lounge brought in a trio of goth heavy hitters spanning the last 40 years in.  The night was opened by Curse Mackey, who seems to have worked with just about everyone on just about everything from Thrill Kill Kult to Pigface.  Second up was a relatively new group called the Bellwether Syndicate (whose work I've grown quite fond of since that show), comprised of William Faith (best known for being one of the founders of Faith and the Muse) and long-time goth DJ Scary Lady Sarah.  They really capture the feel of classic goth and post-punk while still sounding fresh.  Last and certainly not least were gothic veterans Clan of Xymox, still going strong and sounding as powerful as they did when they were first founded in 1981.ev.

Anyway, here are the picture I took.  If you're curious, the Internet Archive has a copy of the concert's livestream to listen to.