Spending quality time with the Pi-Top.

Apr 30 2017

A couple of months ago for my Lesser Feast I decided to treat myself to a toy that I've had my eye on for a couple of months: A Pi-Top laptop kit.  My fascination with the Raspberry Pi aside (which includes, to be honest, being able to run a rack full of servers in my office without needing to install a 40U rack and a new 220 power feed), it strikes me as being a very useful thing to have under one's desk as a backup deck or possibly a general purpose software development computer.  Most laptops have one unique motherboard per model and if you want to upgrade (or need to replace it) you're pretty much limited to buying a brand-new laptop.  To upgrade a Pi-Top you just need to buy a new RaspberryPi, slide a panel aside, and swap a few cables, a system design that I think could be useful indeed.  It also has remarkably few components; the screws and fasteners aside, the PiTop is composed of only a few modules: A base with a battery, a keyboard and touchpad panel, a lid with display, a black lexan access panel, a hub circuit board that ties everything together, and a RasPi.  You can get a couple of modules to go with it, such as a prototype board for electrical engineering experiments and modular speakers, all of which attach to a sliding rail and plug into a unique pinset on the hub.  I'm not an electrical engineer by any means but I have built many a kit over the years, and from eyeballing it it looked like a fairly simple build.  I didn't document the build with photographs or anything because I didn't think to do so at the time.  Sorry.