2020.ev

Jan 01 2020

Well, Happy New Year, everyone.  It's now 2020.ev, we're into the third decade of the twenty-first century.

I'm not sure what we're supposed to do now.  Hell, I'm not even sure of what to do with myself this afternoon.  I guess grab whatever downtime we can get before going back to work/school/whatever.

There have been quite a few people joking about bringing back the roaring 20's, with all sorts of memetic payloads (some silly, some not).  Personally, I wouldn't mind seeing the the Invisibles' take on the 1920's make something of a comeback, but what do I know.  Me being me, of course the first thing I thought of was embracing a little more of the cyberpunk in our world because, hey, why not, anything to stay afloat in a world where getting sick for a week can make the difference between having a roof over your head and destitution.

I know, I'm on a bit of a downer right now.  One part being at loose ends, one part feeling age in my hearts, one part... how in the hell did we make it to 2020?

I don't know.  I don't have one of those "best of 2019" or "best of the 201x's" playlists that folks have been passing around.  I don't have any sort of brilliant evocation to give, or inspirational words to say.  No major announcements to make.  I don't even have any public wishes of "please don't let this year suck" because those do about as much good as thoughts and prayers.  I'm just some schmuck trying to figure out what to do with my life, and maybe make the world a little better in the process.

Happy New Year, everyone.  Let's try to do things a bit better.

Mondo 2000 is back.

Sep 24 2017

If you've been around for a while you may remember a certain magazine called Mondo 2000 from the 90's.  It was a time when using the prefix cyber- wasn't done in irony and computers were still weird and edgy and nobody actually knew what the hell they were doing.  Psychedelic explorers like Timothy Leary and Terence McKenna were still alive (though Leary died in '96 and McKenna four years later), raves required you to go on quests to find map points so you could get your wristband to get in, and we all knew - we just knew - that the Net would usher in an age of understanding because people from vastly different kinds of lives could communicate openly with each other and learn to see eye to eye.

Go ahead and laugh, get it out of your system.

If you've never run across it before, a fair amount of M2k as well as the 'zines that eventually lead to its creation have been uploaded to the Internet Archive so you can read them for free.  Unfortunately, Mondo 2000 ceased publication late in the 90's after a perfect storm of multiple things going sideways within a fairly short period of time.  Frontbeing R.U. Sirius has been around the entire time, working on multiple publishing projects at the same time and keeping his neurons in the game.  I would like to announce that his latest project is the return of Mondo 2000 as a blog featuring articles from many of the original contributors, some classic articles with commentary for the twenty-first century, and insights from some new minds from the other side of the millennium rollover.

Take a look at it and see what you think.  If you like it, please circulate the URL to get more eyes on it.

Neologism: High Gibson

Mar 18 2017

High Gibson - noun, genre - Science fiction in the cyberpunk genre that makes no bones about being inspired by William Gibson's classic works.  Stylistic influences, tropes, and character archetypes are easily recognized as being inspired by the Sprawl Trilogy and the Burning Chrome short stories.  Compare with high fantasy.

Real life seems like Shadowrun - so why can't I throw fragging fireballs?!

Nov 26 2016

From time to time I sit down with my gaming buddies, and we both lament and observe how well reading and playing cyberpunk games has prepared us for life in the twenty-first century. I don't think that many people expected real life to track quite so closely with many a cyberpunk world penned by the masters, from William Gibson to Neal Stephenson to Bruce Sterling. Strangely enough, many of the lifestyle strategies depicted in these stories have helped keep our own lives (and those of our families) stable and, for the most part nice to live as human history has gone nonlinear all around us. Sure, we're seeing early experimenting with direct neural interfaces in hospitals, AI research is changing the world around us faster than we can see (and some of it's even open source), grinders are starting to do some pretty weird stuff with their own bodies, and we have stupidly advanced technology available for next to nothing on the street, but let's dig a little deeper.

What's really fucking with me is how much real life is tracking some of the backstory of Shadowrun.