Technomancer Tools: Note taking with Joplin.

Oct 30 2018

Some time ago I began a search for a decent note-taking tool that I could carry around with me.  For many years I was a devotee of the notes.txt file on my desktop, constantly open in a text editor so I could add and refer to it as necessary.  When that ceased to scale I turned to software that replicated the legions of sticky notes on my desks at work and home, such as Tomboy.  And that worked well enough for a while, but when I started relying upon my mobile more and more for things it too stopped being as useful as I wanted it to be.  For about a year I turned to Simplenote, which is pretty much what it says on the tin: It's a note-taking system with a nice web interface, applications on all of the platforms that I use regularly, and even a command line utility which I used to back up my notes a couple of times a day.  However, Simplenote is a centralized service and there is always a risk that it could go away at any time.  At the very least, the switchover to the Simperium API could have caused problems in the near term for me, and I have enough on my plate these days that I didn't feel like fighting that particular war.  So, the search for a replacement that relied more upon my own infrastructure than someone else's began.

Quick and easy SSH key installation.

Dec 27 2017

I know I haven't posted much this month.  The holiday season is in full effect and life, as I'm sure you know, has been crazy.  I wanted to take the time to throw a quick tip up that I just found out about which, if nothing else, will make it easier to get up and running on a Raspberry Pi that you've received as a gift.  Here's the situation:

You have a new account on a machine that you want to SSH into easily.  So, you want to quickly and easily transfer over one or more of your SSH public keys to make it easier to log in automatically, and maybe make running Ansible a bit faster.  Now, you could do it manually (which I did for many, many years) but you'll probably mess it up at least once if you're anything like me.  Or, you could use the ssh-copy-id utility (which comes for free with SSH) to do it for you.  Assuming that you already have SSH authentication keys this is all you have to do:

[drwho@windbringer ~]$ ssh-copy-id -i .ssh/id_ecdsa.pub pi@jukebox
/bin/ssh-copy-id: INFO: Source of key(s) to be installed: ".ssh/id_ecdsa.pub"
/bin/ssh-copy-id: INFO: attempting to log in with the new key(s), to filter out
    any that are already installed
/bin/ssh-copy-id: INFO: 1 key(s) remain to be installed -- if you are prompted now
    it is to install the new keys

pi@jukebox's password: 

Number of key(s) added: 1

Now try logging into the machine, with:   "ssh 'pi@jukebox'"
and check to make sure that only the key(s) you wanted were added.

Now let's try to log into the new machine:

[drwho@windbringer ~]$ ssh pi@jukebox
Linux jukebox 4.9.70-v7+ #1068 SMP Mon Dec 18 22:12:55 GMT 2017 armv7l

The programs included with the Debian GNU/Linux system are free software;

# I didn't have to enter a password because my SSH pubkey authenticated me
# automatically.
pi@jukebox:~ $ cat .ssh/authorized_keys
ecdsa-sha2-nistp521 AAAAE....

You can run this command again and again with a different pubkey, and it'll append it to the appropriate file on the other machine (~/.ssh/authorized_keys).  And there you have it; your SSH pubkey has been installed all in one go.  I wish I'd known about this particular trick... fifteen years ago?

Keybase and Git.

Nov 27 2017

A couple of weeks ago a new release of the Keybase software package came out, and this one included as one of its new features support for natively hosting Git repositories.  This doesn't seem like it's very useful for most people, and it might really only be useful to coders, but it's a handy enough service that I think it's worth a quick tutorial.  Prior to that feature release something in the structure of the Keybase filesystem made it unsuitable for storing anything but static copies of Git repositories (I don't know exactly waht), but they've now made Git a first class citizen.

I'm going to assume that you use the Git distributed version control system already, and you have at least one Git repository that you want to host on Keybase; for the purposes of this example I'm going to use my personal copy of the Exocortex Halo code repository on Github.  I'm further going to assume that you know the basics of using Git (cloning repositories, committing changes, pulling and pushing changes).  I'm also going to assume that you already have a Keybase account and a fairly up-to-date copy of the software installed.  I am, however, going to talk a little bit about the idea of remotes in Git.  My discussion will necessarily have some technical inaccuracies for the sake of usability if you're not an expert on the internals of Git.

Security nihilism: Never good enough.

Mar 11 2017

In the last couple of years, a meme that's come to be known as security nihilism has appeared in the security community.  In a nutshell, because there is no such thing as perfect security, there is no security at all, so why bother?  Talking about layered security controls that reinforce each other is pointless because they always skip right to the end, which is the circumvention of the nth countermeasure and final defeat.  In the crypto community, cries of "Quantum computer!" are the equivalent of invoking Godwin's Law, leading to the end of all discourse, nevermind trying to separate the marketing hype from what's actually possible or the decade-odd of research into post-quantum cryptosystems.  This has lead to a certain amount of attrition in the community.  It is my considered opinion that this may be one of the main reasons why many so-called security practitioners don't actually bother doing anything, including not even installing patches.  No, I'm not speaking hyperbolically, I've witnessed this first-hand I'm sorry to say.

What is Keybase good for, anyway?

Feb 23 2017

UPDATE - 20170228 - Added more stuff I've discovered about KBFS.

A couple of years ago you probably heard about this thing called Keybase launching with a private beta, and it purported itself to be a new form of public key encryption for the masses, blah blah blah, whatever.. but what's this thing good for, exactly?  I mean, it was pretty easy to request an invite from the service and either never get one, or eventually receive an e-mail and promptly forget about it.  I've been using it off and on for a while, and I recently sat down to really mess around with it and get a sense for how it's changed and what it can do.  Plus, there's a fair amount of outdated or bad information floating around out there, and I wanted to do my part to set the record straight.

I'm not going to spend time explaining public key crypto because I wrote a pretty decent introduction to it that I give at cryptoparties.  Take a look at the PDF of the presentation; I tried to make it as painless as I could.  I want to keep this post focused on Keybase.