Sometimes the old ways may be best.

Feb 02 2019

A couple of weeks back, I found myself in a discussion with a couple of friends about searching on the Internet and how easy it is to get caught up in a filter bubble and not realize it.  To put not too fine a point on it, because the big search engines (Google, Bing, and so forth) profile users individually and tailor search results to analyses of their search histories (and other personal data they have access to), it's very easy to forget that there are other things out there that you don't know about for the simple reason that they don't show stuff outside of that profile they've built up.  If you're a hardcore code hacker you might find it very difficult to find poetry or the name of a television show you saw once unless you take fairly drastic action.  The up-side of this profiling is that, inside of your statistical profile search results are great.  You can find what you need, when you need it.  But outside of that?  Good luck.

The point of the discussion was that there were ways that we could escape this filter bubble through application of self-hosted software and a little cooperation.

Ironically, searching through my conversation history I can't seem to find the thread in question so I'm relying entirely upon on-board storage (as it were).  So, go ahead and laugh while I geek out.  First, a little bit of Internet history.

Technomancer tools: Managing and sharing bookmarks across multiple systems.

May 05 2018

If you have multiple systems (like I do), a problem you've undoubtedly run into is keeping your bookmarks in sync across every browser you use.  Of course, there are services that'll happily do this job on you behalf, but they're free, and we all know what free means.  If you're interested in being social with your link collection there are some social bookmarking services out there for consideration, including what's left of Delicious.  For many years I was a Delicious user (because I liked the idea of maintaining a public bookmark collection that could be useful to people), but Delicious got worse and worse every time it was sold to a new holding company.  I eventually gave up on Delicious, pulled my data out, and thought long and hard about how often anybody actually used my public link collection.  The answer wound up being "In all probability, not at all," largely because I never received any feedback at all, on-site or off.  Oh, well.

For a couple of years I used an application called Unmark to manage my link collection, and it did a decent enough job.  It also had some annoying quirks that, over time got farther and farther under my skin, and earlier this year I kicked Unmark in the head and started the search for a replacement.  Quirks like, about half the time bookmarks would be saved without any of the descriptions or tags I gave themNo search API.  The search function sucked so I couldn't plug my own search function in.  Eventually, the Unmark hosted service started redirecting to the Github repository, and then even that redirect went away.  Unmark hasn't been worked on in eight months, and Github tickets haven't been touched in about as long.  In short, Unmark seems dead as a doornail.

So I migrated my link collection to a new application called Shaarli, and I'm quite pleased with it.

Catching up on posting.

May 26 2016

I'd beg the forgiveness of my readers for not posting since early this month, but chances are you've been just as busy as I've been in the past few weeks. Life, work, et cetera, cetera. So, let's get to it.

As I've mentioned once or twice I've been slowly getting an abscessed molar cleaned out and repaired for the past couple of months. It's been slow going, in part because infections require time for the body to fight them off (assisted by antibiotics or not) and, depending on how deep the infection runs it can take a while. Now I can concentrate on getting the molar in front of it, which has long been a thorn in my side, er mouth, worked on. Between being in close proximity to a rather nasty infection and the general stresses applied to molars during everyday life the seal on the crown broke at some point, leaving it somewhat loose and making squishing sounds when I chew. I don't know the extent of the involvement, but from coming home from work wiped out just about every night I'm starting to suspect that something nasty is going on in there also; it's a pattern that I've come to recognize over the years as suggestive of an immune response. There's a good chance that this particular pain-in-the-ass is going to need major repairs and, given how little of the original tooth is left (I lost count of the number of surgeries and root canals performed on it a couple of years ago) I'm pretty much resigned to losing the tooth entirely. I'll probably wind up getting an implant in its place if it does get pulled for the sole reason that it'l prevent the rest of the teeth in my mandible from slowly drifting to the fill in the space. Of course, if I do get an implant I'll try to stick a magnet to it and if it works I'll post the pictures.