Pretty serious anomalies in the stock market on Monday.

Feb 07 2017

As I've mentioned a few times in the past, diverse parts of my exocortex monitor many different aspects of the world.  One of them, called Ironmonger, constantly data mines the global stock markets looking for anomalies.  Ordinarily, Ironmonger only triggers when stock trading events greater than three standard deviations hit the market.  On Monday, 6 Feb at 14:50:38 hours UTC-0800 (PST), Ironmonger did an acrobatic pirouette off the fucking handle.  Massive trades of three different tech companies (Intel, Apple, and Facebook) his the US stock market within the same thirty second period.  By "massive," I mean that 3,271,714,562 shares of Apple, 3,271,696,623 shares of Intel, and 2,030,897,857 shares of Facebook all hit the market at the same time.  The time_t datestamps of the transactions were 1486421438 (Intel), 1486421431 (Apple), and 1486421442 (Facebook) (I use time.is to convert them back into organic-readable time/date specifiers).  I grabbed some screenshots from the Exocortex console at the time - check them out:

Intel ; Apple ; Facebook

The tall blue slivers at the far right-hand edges of each graph represent the stock trades. I waited a couple of hours and took another set of screenshots (Intel, Apple, Facebook) because the graph had moved on a bit and the transaction spikes were much more visible.  While my knowledge of the stock market is limited, I have to admit that I've never seen multi-billion share stock trades happen before.  Out of curiosity, I took a look at the historical price per share of each of those stocks to see what those huge offers did to them.  The answer, somewhat surprisingly, was "not much."  Check out these extracts from Ironmonger's memory: Facebook, Intel, and Apple.

Because I am a paranoid and curious sort, I immediately wondered if there was a correlation with the large spike in the Bitcoin transaction fee earlier that day (at 13:19:16 UTC-0800, to be precise).  The answer is... probably not.  A transaction fee of 2.35288902 BTC (approximately $2510.93us as of 22:32 hours UTC-0800 on 7 February 2017, as I write this article ahead of time), while a sizeable sum that would certainly guarantee that someone's transaction made it into a block at that very instant does not mean that it was involved.  There just isn't enough data, but it stands on its own as another anomaly that day.  I wish I knew who put those huge blocks of stock up for sale all at once.  The only thing they seem to have in common is that they're all listed on the Singularity Index, which is mildly noteworthy.

Anybody have any ideas?